Sennheiser HD 300 Review

Sennheiser HD 300 Review

Sennhesier engineers must be taking a lot of Ritalin lately because they’ve just released a freqload of affordable, great quality in-ear and over-ear headphones. The over-ear HD 300 is only 50 bucks. What can you expect from Sennheiser at this price point? Let’s find out in this HD 300 Review.

Sennheiser HD 300 Review

FIT

I actually found the HD 300 a little comfier than the HD 400 S. The earpads feel chubbier and softer on the ears. Or maybe it’s the CBD oil I put in my coffee. Who knows. But because the frame is so light, you can probably wear these cans for hours at a time without discomfort. The sound isolation is not bad either even though the fit avoids being too firm.

Sennheiser HD 300 Review

DESIGN

One factor that may make the HD 300 more affordable than the HD 400 S is the cable. Unlike the HD 400 S, the cable on the HD 300 is not detachable. So, if the wire fails on you over time, you’re $%&* out of luck. The good news is that Sennheiser provides a two-year international warranty, and I’ve found that all of their products are solid and reliable.

Sennheiser HD 300 Review

These cans fold, so they work well for on the go use. The only problem is that, unlike the 400 S, the cable has no mic or remote. And you won’t get a carrying case in the package. So, in this respect, it’s kind of a bare bones design. But if your only priority is decent sound while traveling, the HD 300 will certainly suit your needs.

Sennheiser HD 300 Review

SOUND

Overall Impressions: Well balanced, clean, great detail for the price.

Lows

The HD 300 offers somewhat neutral lows. The bass is a little more tempered and polite than it is on the HD 400 S. Still, there’s enough bass presence to give pop sufficient impact. And if you’re a classical or jazz fan, the clean a detailed bass profile will work well for acoustic instruments in this range. Listening to rock, though the low end didn’t provide much warmth, but it was well separated form the higher frequencies.

Mids

The midrange shows presence especially in the upper mids. Because of the subdued lower-mids, you’ll get slightly less body when listening to rock and pop-rock. That being said, vocals avoided sounding harsh or too forward. And again, what’s most impressive about these cans is the clean and well delineated presentation of instruments. It’s a great headphone for folk music, for example, because guitar strums and picks are tidy and precise. And listening to tracks with complex arrangements, there was a very clear layering of instruments for a headphone in this price range.

Highs

Testing out some string tracks, transparency was excellent for a headphone at this price point. As for pop, percussion in this range had plenty of crispy snap. But these headphones lean on the brighter side compared to the pricier HD 400 S. So they’re not as easy on the ears for folks with sensitivity to high frequencies. But if you like your highs a little sparkly, this will be a suitable sound profile.

Soundstage

Wow. Not bad for 50 bucks. The sense of depth is most impressive, and you’ll even get some height too. And in terms of imaging, instrument placement had nice precision especially with respect to width. So, though you may not be blown away by you’ll definitely get a feeling of dimension

SUMMARY

We’ve got a no brainer here. If you listen to all kinds of genres, these no nonsense cans will get the job done with flying colors. Still, a mic and remote would have been nice. And if you prefer a slightly warmer sound with a touch more bass and more forgiving highs, spend the extra 20 bucks, and go for the HD 400 S.

You can find the HD 300 for the best price here:

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